Meeting NASSM: Conference Manager Role

In the Spring of 2020, the NASSM Blog highlighted different individuals with NASSM leadership roles. We hope you enjoyed getting to know them and learning more about NASSM. For our final feature, we asked Stacey Warner to answer some questions about her role as Conference Manager (Note: These interviews were conducted in early February.):

Current faculty position:  Professor at East Carolina University (ECU)

How long have you been at this institution?:   10

Where are you from?:  Central PA

What are your primary responsibilities in your role with NASSM?  I serve as the conference manager for our annual conference. I oversee various aspects of the event including securing future sites, scheduling, budgeting, event operations, and securing & working with sponsorships, exhibitors, and advertisers.

What made you want to get involved with NASSM?   My mentors (Drs. Dixon, Chalip, and Green) did a tremendous job of role modeling the importance of service to the profession.    The environment at ECU, which has a motto of Servire or “to serve”, only further reinforced that. Success for me in this profession is about being able to balance and contribute strong research, teaching, and service.  NASSM offered an arena where I felt like I could serve and my skill set could contribute to the profession.

How do you hope to contribute to NASSM through serving? I feel that the NASSM annual conference should be a strong, healthy, and welcoming place for all sport management researchers and educators. I want to be a part of building and contributing to that type of culture and community.  I know there are Sport Managements colleagues out there that have felt like NASSM is their “home conference”.   I’m someone that wants to listen to those that haven’t felt that yet, understand why, and improve/fix what we can to make the annual conference feel like it’s the conference for all who haven’t found that home yet. The NASSM Conference can’t be everything for everyone, but my hope is it continues to be the conference that Sport Management researchers and educators look forward to going to meet new colleagues and exchange ideas.

What do you think are the biggest challenges NASSM faces?  Leadership, governance, & service.  We are an organization that continues to grow and is very dependent upon voluntary service. We’re very fortunately to have an organization full of gifted leaders and managers who always seem to step up each year, but as the organization grows so do the time demands. So I think restructuring and governance are the biggest challenges (and opportunity!) that NASSM faces.

Dream NASSM destination: Hawaii

Stayed tuned for all NASSM news on Twitter at @NASSM or on the website at nassm.org.

Meeting NASSM Series: President-Elect Role

In the Spring of 2020, the NASSM Blog will be highlighting different individuals with NASSM leadership roles. We hope you enjoy getting to know them and learning more about NASSM. This week, we asked Dr. Damon Andrew, the President-Elect of NASSM to answer some questions about his role: (Note: These interviews were conducted in early February.)

Current faculty position: Dean and Professor, College of Education, Florida State University

How long have you been at this institution? I was a doctoral student at FSU from 2002-04 and returned in my current role in 2018

Where are you from? Pensacola, Florida

What are your primary responsibilities in your role with NASSM? I perform all of the President-Elect duties and also serve as a member of the NASSM ad hoc Governance Working Group

What made you want to get involved with NASSM? I feel NASSM is at a crucial stage of its development as an organization.  NASSM’s stated purpose is “to promote, stimulate, and encourage study, research, scholarly writing, and professional development in the area of sport management (broadly interpreted).”  Further, “NASSM recognizes an essential common body of knledge in sport management that is cross-disciplinary and relates to management, leadership, and organization in sport; behavioral dimensions in sport; ethics in sport management; sport marketing; communication in sport; sport finance; sport economics; sport business in the social context; legal aspects of sport; sport governance; and sport management professional preparation” (http://www.nassm.org/NASSM/Purpose).  Though penned decades ago, these statements illustrate the foresight of early NASSM leaders who knew that inclusive excellence would need to be a cornerstone of NASSM as the organization evolved over time.  The proliferation of organizations focused on various sub-disciplines of sport management is a natural outcome of increasing interest in the discipline, but NASSM needs to continue to be the organization where leaders in all of these sub-disciplines converge to chart the future of the discipline of sport management.

How do you hope to contribute to NASSM through serving? NASSM was founded to be the premier umbrella organization in the field, and I intend to devote my efforts on the Executive Council to ensuring that all members of NASSM, regardless of their sub-discipline specialization, feel welcomed, respected, and valued.

What do you think are the biggest challenges NASSM faces? While membership data indicates interest in the organization, including its journals and annual conference, has never been stronger, the organization essentially has retained the same management-focused board structure since its founding in 1985.  The shift to a new governance-focused structure for the Executive Council will be complex, but it is very much needed if the organization desires to continue its growth while serving as the premier umbrella organization for the field that it was founded to be.

Dream NASSM destination: Doak Campbell Stadium, Tallahassee, Florida 😉