Sport Management Degrees: Teaching So Much More Than Sport

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By Barry Person, Jr. Assistant Professor, Sport and Recreation Management
SUNY Delhi

3EBA0F76-8495-4B60-B080-14C5502D29D8As a Sport Management professor, I am always asked what can my child/I do with a Sport Management degree, the answer is change the world. Bradbury and O’Boyle (2017) stated that sport management has come a long way in the past 20 years; the sport management environment has now evolved into a legitimate professional and commercial sector and continues to grow in size and scope in many nations throughout the world. Yet, the power and applicability of the Sport Management degree fails to garner enough attention. This blog aims to highlight the universal application a Sport Management degree can have within the global economy and society to generate both change and recovery.

The COVID-19 pandemic and current civil justice unrest has provided the unique opportunity for the value and importance of the Sport Management degree to address these issues, not only in academia but also within larger society, to be broadcasted. The notion that sport is a microcosm of society is no secret, but the truth and sustainability of this statement is now being tested. Pending global and societal changes, and advancements which arise from the world’s current situation, can highlight how sport is not only a microcosm of society, but a tool for societal change. Sport is one of the few things in the world that can serve as a universal language and bond. Touchdowns, goals, slam dunks, and home runs are terms that almost anyone in the world can comprehend the meaning of, regardless of their interest in the given sport for which the term is associated. The same can be said for fans who see others with the same jersey, alma mater, or sporting t-shirt; a special bond is instantly created no matter the race, gender, or religion of the individuals involved. So, seeing that sport has become one of the focal points to help stimulate economic recovery, civil unity, and support social justice is no surprise.

However, what is not being highlighted enough is the educational foundation which frames the future of the sport industry. Sport Management degrees hold the power to inspire and spur change within all aspects of sports and society. More importantly, such a degree serves as the foundation from which the push for equality within all levels of sporting administration can truly be achieved. The more sporting organizations become united and equally diverse, so will the society in which we live. The more that the world is shown equality amongst sport ownership, upper management, and coaching/leadership, the more society will embrace the same principles. The realization that Sport Management degrees go beyond coaching and training, but also deal with functioning in the global marketplace and all the social issues that arise within it, should no longer be ignored. To best understand how and why sport has been called upon to kickstart efforts for social justice and diverse equality, one must be well versed in the principles of sport management itself. So as sport continues to be the shining star in the road to global and social recovery, let us not forget the Sport Management degree in this process as well.

The same can be said for the eventual economic recovery for many countries. We regularly see the impact that geopolitics has on the sport management environment through the selection of countries to host mega sporting events such as the Olympic Games and the FIFA World Cup (Bradbury & O’Boyle, 2017). The current push by the entire world to get their sporting leagues back in action, speaks directly to this statement. While sports may not look the same in terms of fans in the stands and/or the postponement of the Olympics, it does not take away from a sporting event’s ability to be an economic stimulant. As restaurants, bars, and clubs continue to reopen, so do the opportunities for sports fans to gather and support these businesses. Being able to identify, create, adjust to, and market such opportunities are core principles within Sport Management studies regardless of institution. So be it in North America, England, Korea, or Italy, Sport Management studies are intertwined in some fashion with all that we do and will be vital to change and recovery. So, to restate what can be done with a Sport Management degree, in a nutshell whatever one chooses to do in order to impact the world, society, and/or economy through sport. The broad applicability and unique perspective which can be developed through sport management studies, offers a one of a kind educational experience that thanks to COVID-19 and current civil unrest, will no longer be cast into the secondary programming tier at institutions of higher learning.

References
Bradbury, T., & O’Boyle. (2017). Understanding sport management international perspectives. New York, NY: Routledge.

Perceived Course Rigor in Sport Management: Class Level, Course Grades, and Student Ratings

During the last half-century, critics of higher education have disparaged institutions for their declining standards and lack of rigor.  The U.S. has slipped in educational rankings while popular culture has glorified the social aspects of college above the intellectual (Arum & Roksa, 2011).  Caught in the middle, particularly as higher education has adopted more business-centric models, are faculty.

By James E. Johnson, Robert M. Turick, Michael F. Dalgety, Khirey B. Walker, Eric L. Klosterman, and Anya T. Eicher. All authors are based at Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana.

During the last half-century, critics of higher education have disparaged institutions for their declining standards and lack of rigor.  The U.S. has slipped in educational rankings while popular culture has glorified the social aspects of college above the intellectual (Arum & Roksa, 2011).  Caught in the middle, particularly as higher education has adopted more business-centric models, are faculty.

While many faculty and administrators strive for high standards, worry over receiving poor student ratings may influence some faculty to lower their expectations/standards.  For example, the grading leniency hypothesis (Marsh & Duncan, 1992) suggests that faculty will inflate grades out of fear of retributional bias (Feldman, 2007) on student ratings. This stress could become amplified when tenure and promotion are at stake and student perceptions are the primary evaluative source for teaching performance.  In sport management, where some programs must combat the easy major label, this issue can become complex.  These beliefs are in contrast to the validity theory (Marsh & Duncan, 1992) that suggests students value a rigorous academic experience and rate faculty accordingly.

Unfortunately, an evaluation of rigor and its potential impact on course/faculty ratings is scarce.  For this study, rigor within individual courses was chosen so that instructor and course could be examined simultaneously.  Predictably, an operational definition of course rigor is elusive.  Removing the subjective nature of the term to objectively define and evaluate this construct is challenging.  Fortunately, Johnson et al. (2019) provided a definition that included the following five components of course rigor.

  • Critical Thinking
  • Challenge
  • Complex Material
  • Time and Labor Intensive (Quantity)
  • Production of Credible Work (Quality)

From those five components, Johnson et al. created seven questions designed to be included in tandem with student rating questionnaires.  Johnson et al.’s work provided the template used to conduct our study of sport management courses.

Methodologically, our study investigated 830 students in 69 sport management courses over the span of four years to determine if course ratings (i.e., student evaluations), course grades, and course level were related to course rigor.  The seven rigor questions developed by Johnson et al. were added to existing student ratings and strongly supported through a factor analysis.  Course ratings were distributed at the end of each semester and included three groups of questions that assessed the instructor, the course, and perceived rigor.

We found that the strongest correlations with course rigor occurred for course and instructor ratings.  Moreover, when predicting course rigor only the overall ratings scores (combined instructor and course scores) and course GPA were significant.  As overall ratings increased so too did the perception of rigor.  As course GPA decreased, rigor perceptions increased.

The pragmatic implications of this work are noteworthy for faculty and administrators.

  • While rigorous coursework may result in lower mean course GPAs, course rigor appears to be appreciated by students. So, the more rigor, the higher student ratings – provided work is appropriate for class level and content area.  This finding supports the validity theory (Marsh & Dunkin, 1992).
  • Because sport management students reported higher instructor, course, and overall ratings when perceived rigor increased (and mean course grades decreased), the grading leniency hypothesis (Marsh & Dunkin, 1992) does not seem to apply.
  • The fear of retributional bias (Feldman, 2007) should be minimized based on our results. This conclusion does not mean that individual students will not provide negative ratings or engage in retributional behaviors on occasion.  Rather, it means at the course level the mean scores over time indicate that if faculty engage in designing and implementing courses with the five elements of rigor, their mean course ratings will likely be improved.

 

Click here for full research article in Sport Management Education Vol. 14, Issue 1.

 

 

References

Arum, R., & Roksa, J. (2011). Academically adrift: Limited learning on college campuses. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Feldman, K. A. (2007). Identifying exemplary teachers and teaching: Evidence from student ratings. In R.P. Perry & J.C. Smart (Eds.), The scholarship of teaching and learning in higher education: An evidence-based perspective (pp. 93–129). Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer.

Johnson, J. E., Weidner, T. G., Jones, J. A., & Manwell, A. K. (2019). Evaluating academic course rigor, Part I: Defining a nebulous construct. Journal of Assessment and Institutional Effectiveness, 8(1-2), 86-121.

Marsh, H. W., & Dunkin, M. J. (1992). Students’ evaluations of university teaching: A multidimensional perspective. In J.C. Smart (Ed.), Higher education: Handbook of theory and research (Vol. 8, pp. 143-234). New York, NY: Agathon Press.

Empirical Investigation of Sport Trademark Dilution Using Contingent Valuation Method

By Sungho Cho, J. Lucy Lee, June Won, and Jong Kwan (Jake) Lee (all authors are affiliated with Bowling Green State University)

TM Dilution_Graphics.pngWould any unauthorized use of sport trademarks be harmful to the brand equity of the marks? What if a sport trademark is extremely strong like Nike or Adidas? What if an unauthorized use has happened in a product category totally not related to sport (such as Manchester Moo United milk and butter)?

Without trademark law, people would need to pay attention on so many things when they want to buy sneakers or gym membership. Trademarks help consumers find desirable goods and services without evaluating product attributes in detail. Thus, trademark law protects owners of legally protected marks from unauthorized use that would likely confuse general consumers as to the sources of goods and services. The legal claim is based on the theory of infringement that focuses on trademarks’ crucial function of information delivery in the market. Since the claim mainly intends to protect general consumers rather than mark owners, plaintiffs must show that people would likely be confused between the marks at issue (e.g., Nike v. Nikee).

In addition to the infringement theory, owners of famous marks can bring lawsuits against unauthorized users under the theory of trademark dilution. Dilution is a legal concept designed to protect intellectual property rights of mark owners. Trademark dilution claims do not require plaintiffs to prove that people are likely confused. Therefore, owners of famous marks such as Nike or Adidas may sue some “noncompetitive” users even if the junior marks would not likely confuse anyone. For instance, Nike successfully brought a lawsuit against Nikepal who was selling biochemical lab supplies even though people might not likely be confused between the sport merchandising brand and Nikepal’s business due to their irrelevant product categories. Studies investigated whether noncompetitive use of famous marks would result in serious damage to the them, but empirical results have been inconsistent.

The current study examined four different situations to see if noncompetitive use of sport trademarks would have harmful effects to them: (1) when two marks sound similar (Nike v. Nikepal); (2) when their logos look similar (Adidas v. Herbalife); (3) when one is a service mark while the other is a trademark (Manchester United v. Manchester Moo United); and (4) when marks are used in an exactly same product category, i.e., sport merchandise (Under Armour v. Uncle Martian). 140 participants were assigned to four subgroups where they tried to purchase goods of the famous sport trademarks online. While participants searched product of their interest, junior marks’ popup ads appear frequently and interrupted their virtual shopping. The perceived financial values of the famous sport trademarks were measured before and after the online shopping experience in conjunction with control group settings.

Nikepal and Herbalife did not negatively affect the brand equity of the exceptionally famous sport trademarks, Nike and Adidas, respectively. But Manchester Moo United (against Manchester United) and Uncle Martian (against Under Armour) resulted in harmful effects on the moderately famous trademarks in terms of their decreased brand equity in financial terms.

For academics, it is notable that exceptionally famous sport trademarks (Nike and Adidas) were immune to trademark dilution. The finding affirms that strong schematic properties of the famous marks would not be easily weakened by the introduction of the cognitively dissonant information (Nikepal and Herbalife). Presumably, the junior marks created information processing that just confirmed the extremely strong brand schemata associated with Nike and Adidas in the minds of participants. Future studies may conduct a series of follow-up inquiries relating to this result in the context of brand management as well as consumer behavior.

For practitioners, the findings suggest that owners of exceptionally famous sport trademarks may need to focus on traditional infringement claim in the enforcement of their trademark rights rather than engage catch-all legal actions that would waste various resources for seemingly insignificant harm. In addition, parties in trademark litigation may use the findings to attack the constitutionality of the federal trademark dilution statute on the ground that the regulation of commercial speech under the law might be unnecessarily restrictive under the First Amendment.

Click here for full research article in Journal of Sport Management Vol 34 Issue 3.

Meeting NASSM: Conference Manager Role

In the Spring of 2020, the NASSM Blog highlighted different individuals with NASSM leadership roles. We hope you enjoyed getting to know them and learning more about NASSM. For our final feature, we asked Stacey Warner to answer some questions about her role as Conference Manager (Note: These interviews were conducted in early February.):

Current faculty position:  Professor at East Carolina University (ECU)

How long have you been at this institution?:   10

Where are you from?:  Central PA

What are your primary responsibilities in your role with NASSM?  I serve as the conference manager for our annual conference. I oversee various aspects of the event including securing future sites, scheduling, budgeting, event operations, and securing & working with sponsorships, exhibitors, and advertisers.

What made you want to get involved with NASSM?   My mentors (Drs. Dixon, Chalip, and Green) did a tremendous job of role modeling the importance of service to the profession.    The environment at ECU, which has a motto of Servire or “to serve”, only further reinforced that. Success for me in this profession is about being able to balance and contribute strong research, teaching, and service.  NASSM offered an arena where I felt like I could serve and my skill set could contribute to the profession.

How do you hope to contribute to NASSM through serving? I feel that the NASSM annual conference should be a strong, healthy, and welcoming place for all sport management researchers and educators. I want to be a part of building and contributing to that type of culture and community.  I know there are Sport Managements colleagues out there that have felt like NASSM is their “home conference”.   I’m someone that wants to listen to those that haven’t felt that yet, understand why, and improve/fix what we can to make the annual conference feel like it’s the conference for all who haven’t found that home yet. The NASSM Conference can’t be everything for everyone, but my hope is it continues to be the conference that Sport Management researchers and educators look forward to going to meet new colleagues and exchange ideas.

What do you think are the biggest challenges NASSM faces?  Leadership, governance, & service.  We are an organization that continues to grow and is very dependent upon voluntary service. We’re very fortunately to have an organization full of gifted leaders and managers who always seem to step up each year, but as the organization grows so do the time demands. So I think restructuring and governance are the biggest challenges (and opportunity!) that NASSM faces.

Dream NASSM destination: Hawaii

Stayed tuned for all NASSM news on Twitter at @NASSM or on the website at nassm.org.

Meeting NASSM Series: President-Elect Role

In the Spring of 2020, the NASSM Blog will be highlighting different individuals with NASSM leadership roles. We hope you enjoy getting to know them and learning more about NASSM. This week, we asked Dr. Damon Andrew, the President-Elect of NASSM to answer some questions about his role: (Note: These interviews were conducted in early February.)

Current faculty position: Dean and Professor, College of Education, Florida State University

How long have you been at this institution? I was a doctoral student at FSU from 2002-04 and returned in my current role in 2018

Where are you from? Pensacola, Florida

What are your primary responsibilities in your role with NASSM? I perform all of the President-Elect duties and also serve as a member of the NASSM ad hoc Governance Working Group

What made you want to get involved with NASSM? I feel NASSM is at a crucial stage of its development as an organization.  NASSM’s stated purpose is “to promote, stimulate, and encourage study, research, scholarly writing, and professional development in the area of sport management (broadly interpreted).”  Further, “NASSM recognizes an essential common body of knledge in sport management that is cross-disciplinary and relates to management, leadership, and organization in sport; behavioral dimensions in sport; ethics in sport management; sport marketing; communication in sport; sport finance; sport economics; sport business in the social context; legal aspects of sport; sport governance; and sport management professional preparation” (http://www.nassm.org/NASSM/Purpose).  Though penned decades ago, these statements illustrate the foresight of early NASSM leaders who knew that inclusive excellence would need to be a cornerstone of NASSM as the organization evolved over time.  The proliferation of organizations focused on various sub-disciplines of sport management is a natural outcome of increasing interest in the discipline, but NASSM needs to continue to be the organization where leaders in all of these sub-disciplines converge to chart the future of the discipline of sport management.

How do you hope to contribute to NASSM through serving? NASSM was founded to be the premier umbrella organization in the field, and I intend to devote my efforts on the Executive Council to ensuring that all members of NASSM, regardless of their sub-discipline specialization, feel welcomed, respected, and valued.

What do you think are the biggest challenges NASSM faces? While membership data indicates interest in the organization, including its journals and annual conference, has never been stronger, the organization essentially has retained the same management-focused board structure since its founding in 1985.  The shift to a new governance-focused structure for the Executive Council will be complex, but it is very much needed if the organization desires to continue its growth while serving as the premier umbrella organization for the field that it was founded to be.

Dream NASSM destination: Doak Campbell Stadium, Tallahassee, Florida 😉

Meeting NASSM Series: Diversity Committee Co-Chairs

In the Spring of 2020, the NASSM Blog will be highlighting different individuals with NASSM leadership roles. We hope you enjoy getting to know them and learning more about NASSM. This week, we asked the co-chairs of the Diversity Committee to answer some questions about their role: (Note: These interviews were conducted in early February.)

Current faculty position: Trevor Bopp (Co-Chair), Assistant Professor, Department of Sport Management, University of Florida & Drew Pickett (Co-Chair), Assistant Professor, Division of Kinesiology & Sport Management, University of South Dakota

How long have you been at this institution? Bopp: I am in my 9th year & Pickett: I am in my 4th year.

Where are you from? Bopp: Alexandria, VA & Pickett: Tampa, FL

What are the primary responsibilities of the Diversity Committee (DC)? The Diversity Committee is charged with advising the Executive Council on all things related to equity and inclusion in NASSM. For example, this year we’ve undertaken a full review of the NASSM Constitution and Operating Codes, looking for potential areas of improvement to help the organization become more inclusive. During the annual conference, we host the Diversity Breakfast event, which aims to welcome attendees from all walks of life and help make connections with others. We also hold a workshop at the conference related to some aspect of diversity and inclusion. For example, last year the DC held a session on the unique needs of NASSM members from teaching institutions. From these sessions, we hope to gain feedback from members that can help us in our advisory role to the organization. As a shameless plug, this year we will host a session on Barriers to diversity and inclusion in NASSM leadership. In this session, we will explore obstacles faced by underrepresented groups in becoming part of the NASSM leadership. Through these and other activities, the DC is committed to serving as a liaison between members and the EC on all diversity-related issues.

What made you want to get involved with NASSM? Bopp: I thought it would be a good way to connect with scholars with similar interests. Additionally, I wanted to be a part of helping advance NASSM in this space. It also serves as an annual reunion with friends and academic acquaintances.  Pickett: I joined NASSM as a graduate student and have been a member ever since. As such, I consider NASSM my ‘conference home’ and I wanted to have a say in its future. My research work focuses on diversity and inclusion, so applying to join the DC seemed a natural fit.

How do you hope to contribute to NASSM through serving? Obviously, as a committee, our goal is see a more inclusive, equitable organization. This means constantly seeking input from a variety of organizational stakeholders and working with the EC to address members’ concerns and meet their needs.

What do you think are the biggest challenges NASSM faces? This year, the DC has honed in on two primary areas of concern, both of which are important for the continued growth of the organization.

First, we have a race problem at NASSM. In its history, NASSM has had very few people of color among its leadership ranks. Not surprisingly, at the most recent conference, concerns were raised about the under-representation of people of color and racial inclusivity of NASSM in comparison to other conferences in our field. As an organization, we must address the lack of racial diversity in leadership and better engage with scholars of color to make NASSM their “home conference”.

Secondly, we must also work to better address the needs of NASSM members at teaching-intensive institutions. As we have grown as a research organization, we have seen declining membership from pedagogically-focused institutions. In the most recent Climate Survey, one common theme suggested NASSM is failing to provide adequate value and meet the needs of individuals from teaching intensive schools. New ideas and initiatives to drive value for these individuals, such as an expanded Teaching & Learning Fair, are needed to (re)engage this group.

Addressing the needs of NASSM’s many varied stakeholder groups is vital for our continued growth and success as an organization. NASSM relies on conference attendance and professional membership as primary revenue sources. Therefore, to continue to be successful, we must continue to look for ways to reduce barriers to entry and better represent all of our members.

Dream NASSM destination: Bopp: As long as I have funding, I will go anywhere. Pickett: I’m from Florida and live in South Dakota (often still below freezing in May/ June), so anywhere warmer works for me!

Meeting NASSM Series: Marketing & Communications Committee Chair

(Note: These interviews were conducted in February.)

Current faculty position: Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts Amherst

How long have you been at this institution? 5 years

Where are you from? Oswego, New York

What are your primary responsibilities in your role as M&C Chair? I oversee strategic marketing and communications initiatives for NASSM, including this blog, social media, an affiliated podcast, and the Google Group list. As Chair of the committee, I also manage all email communications to society members, which requires me to liaise with EC members and other NASSM committees.

What made you want to get involved with NASSM? I first got involved with NASSM as a student representative in 2014 as a way to serve and network with others. As Chair of the M&C Committee, I would say the same is true—I have had the opportunity to get to know other people serving NASSM, who would otherwise just be familiar faces I see each May/June. In addition, as a woman in a male-dominated field, I think it is important to be involved and have a voice in matters.

How do you hope to contribute to NASSM through serving? Since becoming Chair of the M&C Committee, I think I have helped to improve strategic efforts to grow NASSM via multiple communication platforms, as others have done in this role before me. Last year, we conducted a survey with NASSM members on communication preferences, which allowed us to make informed recommendations to the EC on the direction of NASSM’s marketing and communication efforts moving forward.

What do you think are the biggest challenges NASSM faces? I will speak specifically to marketing and communications, since that is where my experience with NASSM has focused. Given rapid technological changes and evolving preferences for communication in general, our committee has been challenged with adapting to promote NASSM in ways that will connect with members. For example, a few years ago, we phased out our seasonal newsletter in favor of more frequent news updates via email and social media. On social media (particularly Twitter, where we are most active given our members’ presence), we have worked to establish a voice, allowing us to better engage with followers. More recently, we were able to partner with Dr. Matt Huml and his State of Sport Management podcast as an additional resource for NASSM members. Looking to the future, I can only assume it will be just as important for NASSM to monitor and adapt to changes in communication preferences to connect with and stay relevant to its members. Adding complexity to this challenge is the diversity of NASSM’s membership (demographically as well as the range in our professional roles), in that not everything we do will appeal to all members.

Dream NASSM destination: Hawaii every 4 years

Meeting NASSM Series: The NASSM business office

In the Spring of 2020, the NASSM Blog will be highlighting different individuals with NASSM leadership roles. We hope you enjoy getting to know them and learning more about NASSM. (Note: These interviews were conducted in early February.)

Robin Ammon is the Business Office Manager for NASSM and the Chair of Kinesiology and Sport Management at the University of South Dakota.

The Business Office Manager for the North American Society for Sport Management is one of the oldest positions in our organization. Since NASSM’s inception in 1986 there have only been two individuals in this position. The first was Garth Paton, from the University of Brunswick, who was the Business Office Manager from 1986-2002. I have held the position since 2002 and at the current time it is housed on the campus of the University of South Dakota. The Business Office Manager has a number of responsibilities, but they fall into three general categories: membership, financial and legal issues.

Membership
The duties pertaining to membership issues are far and away the largest and most complex of my responsibilities. Processing membership dues and conference registration for each attendee, as well as producing receipts for both, takes up the majority of my time. Once the membership registrations have been processed, membership information is forwarded to Human Kinetics, the publisher of the Journal of Sport Management and Sport Management Education Journal for members to receive access to their included copies. The relationship between Human Kinetics and NASSM dates back to the organization’s inception, so nurturing that relationship is vital. Membership information is also sent to TeamWork online, which provides a weekly industry update for current members. Finally, I produce membership lists and figures, as well as contact information, for the NASSM Executive Council as needed.

Since I am the only Executive Council (EC) member with almost 18 years of service, it is often my duty to provide a historical perspective regarding past decisions and background information about the society to current EC members. In addition, I am continuously communicating with NASSM members, prospective students, industry contacts as well as other interested parties to ensure that they receive accurate information pertaining to all matters related to the organization. The majority of member questions pertain to their membership, conference matters that include conference receipts and disputed charges, universities requesting membership information, plus other miscellaneous questions received by telephone, email, and surface mail (yes, I do receive at least one letter every month!) that is directed to the Business Office.

Designing and purchasing the main conference honors such as the Earle F. Zeigler Lecture Award, the Garth Paton Distinguish Service Award, the Distinguished Sport Management Educator Award, the Diversity Award and the Research Fellow Awards is part of the services provided by the Business Office Manager. Finally, I am responsible for providing payment to the Student Research competition winner, the NASSM Service Learning award winner as well as the Janet B. Parks NASSM Research Grant and the NASSM Doctoral Research Grant awardees.

Finally, in order to ensure seamless transition of member benefits as well as questions regarding the NASSM web site I communicate with the Web Administrator on a continuous basis.

Financial
The Business Office Manager pays all NASSM bills (membership and conference) and acts as the liaison between the society’s bank and the organization. I am responsible for reconciling NASSM’s accounts and consult with the NASSM Treasurer regarding our investment portfolio (certificates of deposit). I provide any financial information requested by the NASSM Treasurer or other Executive Council members. Another duty of the Business Office Manager is to deposit all NASSM revenues from members, outside agencies and conference sponsors.

Legal
Finally, the Business Office Manager serves as the liaison with NASSM’s intellectual property attorney and work to ensure the viability of NASSM’s name, trademark, and logo in the US and Canada. I provide support for the efficient operation and payments for NASSM’s General Liability, as well as Directors and Operators insurance policies.

The North American Society for Sport Management has evolved tremendously over its almost 34 years of existence and the Business Office Manager’s duties and responsibilities have evolved as well.

Meeting NASSM Series: Executive Committee Student Member

In the Spring of 2020, the NASSM Blog will be highlighting different individuals with NASSM leadership roles. We hope you enjoy getting to know them and learning more about NASSM. This week, we asked Dominique Kropp to answer some questions about her role as NASSM Student Representative:

My name is Dominique Kropp and I am a Ph.D. Candidate in Sport Management at the University of Kansas. I am from Kearney, Nebraska. As the student representative on the NASSM executive council, I am the voice of NASSM students. As a voting member, I do my best to represent the interests of the students as we are an integral part of the society and annual conference. I also oversee the student initiatives committee, which plans the student events at the conference. In the coming months we will be sending out some information about the exciting plans for NASSM 2020 in San Diego!

I wanted to get involved with NASSM because of the society’s prominence in the field of sport management. I love planning and organizing initiatives, so I applied to be a student initiatives member in charge of the student social for the 2019 New Orleans conference. Because I enjoyed the process and learning about the inner workings of the conference, I decided to run for student representative on the executive council during the 2019-2020 year and I was elected!

By serving on the NASSM executive council, I hope to contribute by providing input from a student perspective and developing exciting opportunities for students at the conference and throughout the year. Perhaps the biggest challenge students face regarding NASSM is the cost of membership and conference attendance. I hope to encourage students to continue attending the annual conference because it is an important investment in each of our futures.

My dream NASSM destination is Hawaii!

Be sure to say “Hi!” when you see Dominique in San Diego!

Meeting NASSM Series: Member-At-Large Part 2

In the Spring of 2020, the NASSM Blog will be highlighting different individuals with NASSM leadership roles. We hope you enjoy getting to know them and learning more about NASSM. This week, we asked Dr. Jon Welty Peachey, Executive Committee Member-At-Large (MAL) to answer some questions about his role:

Current faculty position: Associate Professor, Department of Recreation, Sport and Tourism, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

How long have you been at this institution? 7 years

Where are you from? I’m originally from a small town in the mountains near Pittsburgh, PA.

What are your primary responsibilities in your role as an EC Member-at-Large? In this capacity, my primary responsibilities are to oversee the Garth Paton Distinguished Service Award and the Diversity Award. I also have responsibility for updating the journal impact factor list on the NASSM website.

What made you want to get involved with NASSM? NASSM has been instrumental in my career development, and the friends and networks I’ve developed through NASSM have been very rewarding. I wanted to give back to the organization and help to create change as needed to help us meet the needs of all members.

How do you hope to contribute to NASSM through serving? I’d like to help make NASSM more inviting and welcoming to all.

What do you think are the biggest challenges NASSM faces? I believe the biggest challenge continues to be creating a welcoming and inviting climate and organization that equally values diverse perspectives and backgrounds of our members.

Dream NASSM destination: If we are shooting for the stars, let’s go to Fiji.