Announcing a Proposed New Governance Structure for NASSM

by Damon Andrew, NASSM President and Bri Newland, NASSM President-Elect

As many of you know, the NASSM leadership has been exploring a governance restructure for nearly a decade. In 2013, then NASSM President Larena Hoeber appointed a task force of professional members – Bob Baker, Carol Barr, George Cunningham (Chair), Katie Misener, and Jim Weese – to explore options for structural and operational changes to the Society. The recommendations from that task force were advanced as Presidents George Cunningham, Laurence Chalip, and Lisa Kihl led the strategic planning efforts of the society over the next few years. In 2018, then NASSM President, Lisa Kihl, progressed the governance restructure effort as Chair of the NASSM Governance Task Force with professional members, Damon Andrew, Laura Burton, Milena Parent, Scott Tainsky, Nef Walker, and Mike Odio. Then one of this blog’s authors, Bri Newland, current President-Elect, took over as Chair from Lisa Kihl and have continued to lead the work of the task force – Mike Odio, Milena Parent, Damon Andrew, and Laura Burton, with Scott Tainsky as ex officio.

Current Situation & Issues

The current NASSM Executive Council functions as an operational board and has remained largely unchanged since its inception, though additional member-at-large positions have been added over time as operational needs grew along with the organization. As an operational board, the EC is composed of elected or appointed volunteers who learn and perform a variety of operational tasks throughout their terms of service. As NASSM grew, more positions were added to the Executive Council as a short-term strategy to meet the operational needs of the organization. Over time, this has resulted in a larger number of volunteers performing operational tasks on behalf of NASSM. However, the coordination of these operational tasks has increased, resulting in less time for proactive strategic governance by the Executive Council as the learning and performance of operational tasks has absorbed the efforts of its volunteer members. Moreover, long-term strategic planning for NASSM is challenging with the current structure of the Executive Council due to the limited terms of the leadership (i.e., president, president-elect, and past-president). Welcoming a new President each year, who must learn and perform a new set of operational duties in addition to leading the Executive Council, makes strategic leadership difficult. Past Presidents of NASSM have lamented that the wide variance of expected duties during the three years of total service is challenging. The President-Elect and Past-President years are primarily management-focused while the Presidency year is leadership-focused. Therefore, the current governance structure of NASSM with its operationally-focused Executive Council and short terms of service for officers actively works against the need for NASSM to be more proactive and strategic in its operation.

New Proposed Structure

Based upon the Executive Council and task force work referenced previously over the past decade as well as NASSM’s strategic plan, a strategic governing board paired with an executive director and personnel that perform operational duties would best serve NASSM as an organization, both now and for the foreseeable future. Thus, the current NASSM Governance Task Force has worked to develop a new governance model for the NASSM membership for consideration and vote. The following organizational chart illustrates the new structure (Figure 1).

Figure 1. Proposed NASSM Governing Board Structure

As noted in Figure 1, operational duties of the organization are proposed to be led by an Executive Director with the necessary experience to ensure the day-to-day operation of the organization is accomplished effectively. NASSM personnel, journal editors, and supporting standing committees with an operational focus would report through the Executive Director, who would report to the Governing Board. The Governing Board would include a President, Vice-President, and six officers who would serve longer staggered terms to support a strategic focus and the retention of organizational history, and the student representative would also serve on the governing board with a one-year term and optional renewals based on election outcomes. Moreover, certain standing committees with more of a strategic focus would report directly to the Governing Board, with the board enhancing communication through ex-officio service on those committees.

Next Steps & Call to Action

At the upcoming Annual General Meeting (AGM) held during the 2021 NASSM Conference, the membership will have the opportunity to vote on the adoption of this new structure. To support the possibility that the new governance structure may be adopted, the current NASSM Governance Task Force has prepared accompanying drafts of the NASSM Constitution and Operating Codes to allow the organization to immediately shift into this new model if the motion passes. Moreover, the task force has also prepared a transition plan that respects the service terms of those elected to the Executive Council while ultimately transitioning the organization to the longer and staggered service terms of the proposed Governing Board over a few transitional years. In order to prepare for this vote, the membership will have the opportunity to review the proposed constitution and operating code. These documents are available on the NASSM website (for access, log in with your NASSM membership in the upper right corner). In anticipation of potential questions about the governance structure and the accompanying transition details, NASSM President, Damon Andrew, and President-Elect, Bri Newland, will be hosting three Zoom Q&A seminars to discuss the new structure and answer any questions from members prior to the AGM. The meetings will be held on the following days:

Thursday, May 13 from 3-4pm EST

Monday, May 17 from 1-2pm EST

Thursday, May 20 from 2-3pm EST

Your feedback is incredibly important to us. Therefore, we urge all members to review the materials and join us for discussion prior to the AGM so that you will be fully prepared to vote during the limited time available at the AGM.

Best,

Drs. Damon Andrew and Bri Newland

President and President-Elect, NASSM

Meeting NASSM Series: The President Role

In the following months, the NASSM Blog will be highlighting different individuals with NASSM leadership roles. We hope you enjoy getting to know them and learning more about NASSM. Our first post highlights our current and past-presidents. Presidents are elected for three year terms, where they serve as President-Elect, President, then Past-President, each with their own roles and responsibilities.

 

Lisa Kihl, Ph.D., Past-President NASSM

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Dr. Lisa Kihl

 

Current faculty position: Associate Professor, School of Kinesiology, University of Minnesota

How long have you been at this institution? 17 years

Where are you from? Australia

What are your primary responsibilities in your role with NASSM? Past president roles- conference manager and chair NASSM governance working group.

What made you want to get involved with NASSM? Networking, learn about the field, colleagues encouraged me.

How do you hope to contribute to NASSM through serving? Mentoring students and junior faculty; assisting with the implementation of the strategic plan, and aiming to create a more inclusive and supportive association.

What do you think are the biggest challenges NASSM faces? Current governance system and addressing the wide array of membership needs.

Dream NASSM destination: Turks and Cacaos

 

Bob Heere, Ph.D., President of NASSM

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Dr. Bob Heere

Current faculty position:  Professor, Department of Management & Director of Sport Entertainment Management

How long have you been at this institution? About 20 months

Where are you from? The Netherlands, I received my PhD at Florida State University

What are your primary responsibilities in your role with NASSM?  To represent our society in our interactions with our stakeholders and oversee the governance of our Society

What made you want to get involved with NASSM?  Sport management is a small niche, and our boats rise and fall together with the academic tides. Supporting our Society is a crucial component of our service and directly benefits our own careers. I never saw it as a choice, but as a necessity.

How do you hope to contribute to NASSM through serving?  As the president, first and foremost, I try to make myself available to everyone engaged with NASSM, answering any questions they have, or supporting the initiatives they bring forward to our Society. Sometimes, the best thing you can do is stay out of the way of the people who champion certain initiatives. On my end, I have been focused on increasing our transparency in decision making, increasing the engagement of our members, help our committees refocus on their primary responsibilities, and building or modifying the relationship with our partners. For example, we just signed a new partnership with the International Association for Venue Managers (IAVM), and were able to renegotiate our contract with Human Kinetics, which will alleviate the financial burden of our members to carry on that relationship.

What do you think are the biggest challenges NASSM faces? Right now, NASSM is at a crossroads, and its biggest challenge is adjusting its governance structure to the changing demands of scholarly life. The implementation of such a change impacts everything and holds back other initiatives. This restructure has been advocated for, for over a decade, and we are finally able to explore its implementation because of increased sponsorship revenues, and decreased journal subscription costs.

Dream NASSM destination: Frisco, TX, so I don’t have to travel and I can share with our members who amazing this city is when it comes to sport 😊

 

 

Stay tuned for future “Meeting NASSM” blog posts about other NASSM leaders…

New to NASSM Conference: Guide to Maximizing Your Time

By Natalie L. Smith (East Tennessee State University) & Kerri Bodin (University of Ottawa)

Great choice! You are headed to NASSM’s Annual Conference for the first time, and we’re sure you’re excited to learn new things and meet new people. But we’re guessing this is also somewhat intimidating. As one of the largest and oldest conferences in our field, the NASSM Annual Conference can be somewhat overwhelming for first time attendees. Here is a friendly guide to the conference itself:

First thing first, read the program schedule ahead of time. Pre-plan what presentations you want to go to. Make sure to build in breaks to let your mind process all the information. You do not have to try to go to every session available. When you do go to sessions, ask questions during the sessions, this is an opportunity for researchers to hear suggestions or new ideas that may improve or build on their current research. If you want to speak to the presenter afterward, make sure to go outside the room to do so, as the presentation timeline is tight.

Reach Out Early: If a topic or a person really sparks your interest from the program schedule, reach out to them and ask for a meeting or simply say you look forward to seeing them at the conference. Those scheduled break times are a great time to chat for 20 minutes in a centrally located area. Be flexible about it, some of these more senior NASSM members have dozens of old friends to reconnect with as well as committee or leadership responsibilities.

Add the app. Be sure to download the Attendify app then search NASSM for the official 2019 NASSM conference app (sponsored by Sports Travel Academy. Event Code: nassm19) or click here.

Practical Tip: If you are presenting, bring a flash drive and presentation remote (via @DocJamesWeiner)

What Are All These Events? (This only covers events with a social component or opportunities to learn more about NASSM)

Past-President’s Workshop (Wed 4:00-6:00pm, Nottoway, 4th Floor) – Every year, the past-president hosts a workshop on a different topic.

Opening Reception (Wed 7:00-9:00pm, Armstrong Room) – The first event of the evening, this is the time to chat with someone new. You see your colleagues and friends all year long, now is the time to engage with peers elsewhere in the field. Use the drink line as an excuse to chat with the person behind you. Meet new people in groups of 2 if you’re too shy to go on your own. This is a very unstructured time, so use it to have new conversations. Dress code: Business casual usually.

NASSM 101 (Thurs 8:30-9:15am, Napolean A1) – A great way to learn about NASSM itself and  how to get involved.

NASSM Annual General Meeting (Fri 4:00-5:00pm, Napoleon BC) – Learn about the state of NASSM, keep informed of changes, updates, and general concerns. Become more familiar with NASSM’s Executive Council. Every member is welcome to attend!

WIN (Women in NASSM) Meeting (Fri 5:30-7:00pm, location TBD) – An unofficial but long-standing event that brings together any woman in NASSM interested. A great way to meet new people.

Diversity Breakfast (Sat 7:00-8:00am, Napoleon B1) – Hosted by the Diversity Committee, an informal breakfast to network and chat with those interested in diversity topics. Everyone is welcome, even if you don’t do diversity research. Again, another great way to meet new people.

Founders’ Awards Night (Sat, Cocktail Reception 6:15-7:00pm, Dinner 7:00-9:00pm, Napoleon Foyer & Ballroom) – A more formal affair that includes a cocktail reception beforehand. The cocktail hour is another great opportunity to meet people (seeing a trend?).

What are all these committee meetings on the schedule?  Sounding a bit too much like a mafia boss, “eh, don’t worry about it.” Maybe you’ve noticed on the event schedule a few meetings such as “Executive Council Hand over” or the “SMEJ Editorial Board Meeting.” They are for folks on those boards or committees. Go ahead and ignore those parts of the schedule (unless you are on that board or committee!), but also take note of any committee that sparks your interest. Reach out to the chair and ask about opportunities to get involved. You can find standing committee chairs’ contact information here and the Executive Council here.

What do I wear? This for me, is always the toughest. Maybe as a former sports business professional or maybe as a woman, I always stress about dress code. I’ve found NASSM attendees dress in a range from full business to, what I call, outdoor recreation business casual (outdoor shirt short-sleeved button down). The Founders’ Awards Night tends to be more formal, the opening reception not as much. Everyone has a different opinion on this, but I will say, wear things that make you feel confident and comfortable, so you can focus on the exchange of ideas.

What is happening for students? That student board works hard for you, so take advantage of their efforts. I found student events is where I met future collaborators, new friends, and I’ve heard for some, future colleagues. Check out the student events here.

One last piece of advice: Not every conversation leads to a collaboration or a job offer, but every conversation at NASSM is worth having. Your To-Do list will always be there and your presentation will never be perfect. Instead, use this time to be curious, to engage, and to be inspired. The combined intellect, passion for research, teaching and/or service, makes for an invigorating several days.

Authors: Natalie is an Assistant Professor of Sport & Recreation Management at ETSU in Johnson City, TN. She attended her first NASSM conference as a PhD student in Austin in 2013. Kerri is a PhD student at the University of Ottawa in Ottawa, Ontario. She attended her first NASSM conference as a Master’s student in Denver in 2017.

Thank you to @Matt_Huml, @markaslavich, @morrsport, @ChadMcEvoy, @TimDeSchriver for your assistance in providing advice to first-timers!

Executive Committee Fall Meeting Recap

By Lisa Kihl, NASSM President

The Fall 2018 EC meetings were held in October at the site for the NASSM 2019 Conference in New Orleans. The day and half meetings involved a robust agenda that included reports given related to strategic planning working groups, new initiatives, operating code revisions and additions, new communication initiatives, budget, journals, and NASSM awards. Below are some of the highlights that I would like to share with the membership.

  1. Strategic working groups: Three working groups (archivist, governance and conference) presented reports. Based on the archivist group’s report, we will form a 2-3 person committee for a 3-year period to liaise with the archivists at Bowling Green State University (where the NASSM archives are located). The group would also assist with managing the archives, collecting content, and maintaining quality. The EC also received initial reports from the governance and conference working groups. We are now considering different governance frameworks that could guide potential restructuring. The EC discussed the information presented and offered feedback on strengths and suitability of the proposed structures and how to move forward. We look forward to receiving their proposals at the May meetings. I would like to thank the following NASSM members for their time and service toward NASSM’s strategic plan:

Archivist: Chair, Laurence Chalip (George Mason University), Jillian McNiff (Flagler College), Norm O’Reilly (University of Guelph, and Scott Tainsky (Wayne State University)

Governance: Chair, Meg Hancock (Louisville University), Spencer Harris (University of Colorado, Colorado Springs), Milena Parent (University of Ottawa), and Darlene A. Kluka (Dean Emeritus and consultant)

Conference: Chair, Janet Howes (St Joseph University), Janet Howes (St Joseph University), Shannon Kerwin (Brock University), Brian Menaker (Texas A&M University-Kingsville), Nicole Melton (University Massachusetts-Amherst), Bri Newland (New York University), and Kristy Spence (Brock University)

  1. New initiatives: The EC approved a NASSM Senior Research Fellow Award which will be implemented in 2020. Look for more details to be released about the Award’s purpose and criteria after the May EC meetings.
  2. Journals: The Journal of Sport Management (JSM) and Sport Management Education Journal (SMEJ) display strong growth. JSM continues to have record submissions and a rising impact factor. Rob Hardin is the new SMEJ editor and announced a Special Issue on study abroad programs that will be published in 2020. The EC encourages the membership to continue to support our journals.
  3. Budget: In many respects due to the success of the 2018 conference in Haifax, we are in a sound financial position, which will allow NASSM to continue to support grant funding.
  4. Communications: The EC approved a new communications strategy. NASSM will transition into managing its own listserv using Google groups. Look for an invitation this spring for individuals to join the list. In addition, all social media information will be streamlined. The communications committee will add two new members to assist with the transition and management of NASSM owned and operated communications. Look for a call this spring for volunteers to serve on this committee.
  5. NASSM awards: The various awards committees presented their nominee recommendations for vetting and approval. Stay tuned for an announcement about award winners which will be presented during the 2019 conference in New Orleans.

I want to THANK the members of the Executive Council and the standing committees for your time and dedication in serving NASSM. We could not exist and/or meet the needs of the membership without your commitment to serving NASSM.

I look forward to seeing everyone at the 2019 Conference in New Orleans.